Google adds more browsing security to your Android device

Installing apps from external sources can lead you to an infection because apps aren't necessarily validated by store approval teams.

Google said the new requirements are part of an expanded enforcement of its unwanted software policy, which aims to protect users from deceptive software.

Google announced plans to crack down on Android applications that fail to warn users when they are collecting personal data.

If an app uses a user's phone number or email address or device data, it will need to prompt the user and provide a privacy policy within the app.


In other words, the warnings may be applied to sites and software that promote apps that violate its policy, as well as the offending apps themselves. The regulations will come into place in the next "60 days" - let's say, February 1- and a Safe Browsing/ Google Play Protect warning will be shown on all pages leading to the non-compliant apps. This way, users can be protected even when they browse to websites that provide app installation. For instance, if an application requires sending analytics, it can't transmit information unrelated to the app unless it discloses the reason and gets permission from the user.

Popular apps such as Uber, Spotify, and Tinder use Google's Crashlytics crash reporting feature to access insights into people's behaviour.

The OS maker is giving app developers 60 days to fix their issues and update apps with notifications of their full practices. The amended policy introduced a requirement for an app to provide prominent disclosure if it collects and transmits personal user data unrelated to the app's main functionality described in the Play Store listing. This will help to crack down on malicious apps, including those from third-party sources that would previously go unnoticed by the Safe Browsing service.


Popular

CONNECT